Journal of China's Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2 (2016)
  发布时间: 2017-12-07   访问次数: 121

Center for China’s Relations with Neighboring Countries of Fudan University (CCRNC-Fudan), ed., Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016.

Publisher: Social Sciences Academic Press (China)

Published in October 2018.

ISBN: 978-7-5201-3505-4


The Title Page of Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016


The Copyright Page of Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016

Contents

Preface                                                   Qi Huaigao / 1

Comprehensive Studies on China’s Neighboring Diplomacy

Retrospect and Prospect on China’s Asia-Pacific Strategy: From Integration to Construction of a Community               Wu Chunsi / 9

The Strategic Transformation of the Land-Maritime Complex Powers in History and Their References to China      Qin Lizhi / 24

An Analysis on the Path to Achieve the FTAAP                Zhou Shixin / 52

“The Belt and Road” Research

The Coordination of “the Belt and Road” Initiative with ASEAN Development Strategies: From “on the Border” to “beyond the Border”         Zhao Jianglin / 83

The Foundations, Challenges and Feasible Paths for China and Philippines to Jointly Build the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road  Lin Yongxin / 101

Possible Integration of China’s “The Belt and Road” and Indonesia’s Strategy of “Global Maritime Fulcrum”                     He Yongpeng / 114

Sub-Regional Studies on Northeast Asia

Russia’s Policy towards the Korean Peninsula and China’s Response    Xu Bo / 133

Sub-regional Studies on the Southeast Asia

The Roles of NGOs in Japan’s Diplomacy towards Southeast Asia and the Implications for China         Bao Xiaqin, Huang Bei / 149

The Development of Indonesia’s Marine Economy and Its Implications for the Policy of China-Indonesia Cooperation on Marine Economy            Wu Chongbo / 165

ASEAN Economic Community and Its FDI Dimension      Li Wannan / 181

Lancang-Mekong Cooperation: New Cooperate, New Community, New Challenge

Patcharinruja Juntaronanont and Piti Srisangnam / 202

Studies on the Issues of South China Sea

The Background and Nature of the Philippines-Initiated Arbitration Case on South China Sea Issues: From the Perspective of the Game between China, Japan, and U.S. for Maritime Power       Gao Lan / 215

The Clues of Events and the Characteristics of the South China Sea Issues: From the Perspective of International Media in 2015  Ju Hailong / 235

Reviews on Symposiums

A Review on the Symposium of “Common Development of the South China Sea: The Experience of European Coal and Steel Community and the Reference from the Joint Development of Lancang-Mekong River”        Chen Miaoling / 257

A Review on the International Symposium of “Integration between the ASEAN Community and the ‘the Belt and Road’ Initiative”  Zhang Qun / 264

A Review on the Symposium of “the Prospect and Challenges of the Relations between China and the Philippines”   Liu Qingyao and Li Hongmei / 278

A Review on the Symposium of “Peripheral Situations of Northwest China and the ‘New Silk Road Economic Belt’”          Ma Bin / 288

  

Appendix

Introduction on the Collaborative Innovation Center for Territorial Sovereignty and Maritime Rights (CICTSMR) /301

Introduction on Center for China’s Relations with Neighboring Countries (CCRNC) /303

Notice Inviting Contributions to the Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy /305

  

Retrospect and Prospect on China’s Asia-Pacific Strategy: From Integration to Construction of a Community      Wu Chunsi

Abstract:Since 1980sChina’s diplomacy towards the Asia-Pacific region has experienced a process of re-integrating itself into the regional integration framework. During this processChina has not only made tremendous achievement in its social and economic relations with East Asian countriesbut also reached a consensus with them through peaceful development and cooperation. Howeverthe overall security environment in the Asia-Pacific has been largely changed since the year 2010 when the U.S. began to implement its rebalance strategy in this region. This situational change has damaged China’s relations with major powers of East Asia simultaneously and pulled the East Asian regional cooperation into a stagnancy. Under such circumstancesChina has to surpass its traditional strategy to get itself integrated into this region and promote the construction of a regional community through more active postures. The major content of China’s effort to construct a regional community includesre-defining regional agenda through development of cooperationstrengthening a mechanism of interest coalescing and sharingand an endeavor to promote the creation of new types of ideas that fit for the zeitgeist and characteristics of the Asia-Pacific regionsuch as the idea of plural symbiosisthe concept of Asian mainstreamand the sense of joint sharing and common burdening.

Author:Wu Chunsi, Ph.D., Director of the Institute for International Strategic Studies at the Shanghai Institute of International Studies.

Official citation:Wu Chunsi, Retrospect and Prospect on China’s Asia-Pacific Strategy: From Integration to Construction of a Community”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 9-23.

  

The Strategic Transformation of the Land-Maritime Complex Powers in History and Their References to China  Qin Lizhi

Abstract:The strategic transformations of the grand strategies of those land-maritime complex powers are reflected on four major aspectsstrategic focusoffensive and defensive policyorientation on balanceand strategy for alliance. Based on an observation of these four aspectsthe author analyzes the causessuccessesand failures of the strategic transformations of Germany 1890-1918and Soviet Union 1962-1982. Then the author analyzes the major challenges and limitationsand concerns that confront China’s strategic transformation at the presentChina’s dual vulnerability to geopolitical threats that may lead to an over-dispersion of its military resourcesthe limitations brought by China’s in-born geographical conditionsthe low level availability and efficacy of alliancethe orientation to avoid over-expansionand the necessity to keep the coherence of strategic decision making. In China’s strategic transformationthe easiest task might be the technological innovationswhile the most difficult ones might be the strategic decision makings and judgments on threats. Thereforeit is necessary to keep a balance between economic construction and military expendituredomestic foreign affairsland and maritime strengthsand means and purposes of China’s grand strategy. Furthermorean importance should be attached to the strategic orientations emphasizing defensiveness and deterrence. More efforts are needed to strengthen the control and management of crisis with a simultaneous consideration on the maritime power’s nature as a provider of public goods for international security.

Author: Qin Lizhi, Ph. D candidate of the School of International Studies and Public Affairs, Fudan University.

Official citation:Qin Lizhi, “The Strategic Transformation of the Land-Maritime Complex Powers in History and Their References to China”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 24-51.

  

An Analysis on the Path to Achieve the FTAAP                  

Zhou Shixin

Abstract:The idea of Free Trade Area for Asia-Pacific FTAAPwas originally proposed by the APEC Business Advisory Council in 2004. Since thenresearches and planning on the FTAAP has been listed into the agendas of APEC and attracted more and more attentions. The APEC conferences have also passed some policy documents on this issue. The 2014 APEC Beijing Summit came up with a more specific roadmap on how to construct the FTAAPwhich may provide a framework of action plans for the researchesnegotiationsand implementations of FTAAP. Currentlythere are four paths of policymaking to build this FTAAPpromoting the existing mechanism of APECsolely depending on RCEP and TPPintegrating the RCEP and TPPand realizing the Bogor Goals. Howeverthese four paths are all confronted with big challenges. There is even a possibility that FTAAPTPPand RCEP may coexist with one another. The present situations reveal that there is a trend that FTAAP construction is being gradually integrated into the agenda-settings and issue implementations of the APEC system. It will be carried forward and brought into more specific policy practices in future.

Author: Zhou Shixin, Assistant Professor, Director of the Big Power Diplomacy Section of the Foreign Policy Research Institute at the Shanghai Institute for International Studies.

Official citation:Zhou Shixin, “An Analysis on the Path to Achieve the FTAAP”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 52-80.

  

The Coordination of “the Belt and Road” Initiative with ASEAN Development Strategies: From “on the Border” to “beyond the Border”         

Zhao Jianglin

Abstract:The integration between the “the Belt and Road” Initiative and the ASEAN Development Strategies is both the outcome of the rapid development of China-ASEAN economic and trade relations in the past and a future direction for deepening China-ASEAN bilateral economic and trade relations. It reflects a qualitatively significant leap of the China-ASEAN economic and trade relations from “on-the-border” cooperation towards “beyond-the-border” cooperationwhich will make new contributions to the economic development and common prosperity of both China and ASEAN. In the futureChina and ASEAN need to intensify their efforts in the fields of productive capacity cooperationmutual connectivity and financial cooperation. In this waya system of China-ASEAN common economic growth can be built.

Author: Zhao Jianglin, Professor of the National Institute of International Strategy, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

Official citation:Zhao Jianglin, “The Coordination of ‘the Belt and Road’ Initiative with ASEAN Development Strategies: From ‘on the Border’ to ‘beyond the Border’”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 83-100.

   

The Foundations, Challenges and Feasible Paths for China and Philippines to Jointly Build the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road                     

Lin Yongxin

Abstract:Due to the South China Sea disputesespecially the arbitration unilaterally initiated by the Philippines during the Aquino IIIs administrationpolitical distrust and strategic misjudgment between China and Philippines led to misunderstanding and suspicion on the The Belt and Roadinitiative by Philippinesresulting in a negative influence on Philippines willingness to participate in the 21st Maritime Silk Road. Duterte administration may change the policy towards Chinawhich will help to improve the Sino-Philippines relations and promote bilateral cooperation. In factthe politicaleconomicand cultural foundations for China-Philippines cooperation on the The Belt and Roadcan be found in the developments of China-Philippines relations in the pastsuch as the China-Philippines consensus that have been reached ever since the establishment of formal diplomatic relations between these two countriesthe growth of bilateral trade and the nature of mutual complementarity of this tradeand the gradually recovered cultural exchanges. Howeverthe cooperation is facing some challengesincluding political distrustconstraints from U.S. and JapanPhilippines domestic political culture and the rise of its nationalism in Philippines. At presenttwo countries can cooperate in the fields of policy communicationinfrastructure investmentsconstructions of industrial parksmarine affairsrisk assessment and so on. Such cooperation not only fit for the demands of development strategy of both countriesbut also benefit the long-term development of relations between China and Philippines.

Author: Lin Yongxin, Research Associate, Deputy Director of Research Center for Maritime Silk Road, National Institute of South China Sea Studies.

Official citation:Lin Yongxin, “The Foundations, Challenges and Feasible Paths for China and Philippines to Jointly Build the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 101-113.

  

Possible Integration of China’s “The Belt and Road” and Indonesia’s Strategy of “Global Maritime Fulcrum”    He Yongpeng

Abstract:The pace of the “the Belt and Road” initiative is largely connected to the orientations of countries along the road. Indonesia as the regional power in Southeast Asiaproposed the strategy of “Global Maritime Axis”which shares similar implications and objectives with China’s initiative. It is possiblefeasibleand necessary to integrate Indonesia’s strategy with China’s initiative. China and Indonesia may find out breakthroughs through the three paths of mutual connectivityfishery cooperationand security cooperation. Howevera somber evaluation on the risks of such integration should be madebecause risks are a great concern that China should deal with cautiously. On this issue of integrating its own initiative with the Indonesia’s strategyChina should insist on its leading role and strike a balance between political and economic gains. Besidesthe deficiency of Indonesia’s domestic governance and its foreign policy of keeping a balance between great powers may pose a potential threat to bilateral cooperation. Despite of all these risks and uncertaintiesa success on this integration will promote bilateral relationsimprove the regional diplomatic environment and bring strategic breakthroughs to China.

Author: He Yongpeng, Postgraduate for Masters Degree in International Relations, School of International Studies and Public Affairs, Fudan University.

Official citation:He Yongpeng, “Possible Integration of China’s ‘The Belt and Road’ and Indonesia’s Strategy of ‘Global Maritime Fulcrum’”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 114-130.

  

Russia’s Policy towards the Korean Peninsula and China’s Response    

Xu Bo

Abstract:Russia is a key member of “Six Party Talks” because its national interests are closely connected to the situational changes of the Korean Peninsula. After DPRK’s fourth and fifth nuclear testsRussian government firmly opposed DPRK’s nuclear program. On the other handit did not intend to undermine the current development of Russia-DPRK relations. The increasingly isolated position of North Korea in the international community also adds more incentives for Russia to develop its relations with DPRK. MeanwhileTHAAD system has become a new variable affecting Russia-DPRK relations. Russia government judges that a “hard landing” will not take place in Korean Peninsulaand intends to downgrade the tension in the region. Russia’s current policy is to contact both DPRK and ROK equally so as to keep a balance and maintain its independent position. On the one handit responds to DPRK’s security concern. On the other handit takes an effort to improve economic cooperation with ROK at the same time. China should not hold a high expectation on Russia’s policy towards the Korean Peninsula. China’s leading role on the Korean Peninsula should be recognized if any resolution can be found out for this Peninsula.Particularlyit should be encouraged to intensify its economic cooperation with DPRK and expand its communication and coordination with DPRK on the issues related to THAAD system and border problems.

Author: Xu Bo, Associate Professor of Northeast Asian Studies College, Jilin University, Postdoctoral Scholar of Research Programs Jointly Conducted by the Jilin University and Political Science Department of University of Iowa (U.S.).

Official citation:Xu Bo, “Russia’s Policy towards the Korean Peninsula and China’s Response”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 133-145.

  

The Roles of NGOs in Japan’s Diplomacy towards Southeast Asia and the Implications for China                          Bao Xiaqin, Huang Bei

Abstract:As a developed country with a vibrant civil societyJapan has a great number of non-government organizations widely distributed around the world. Southeast Asia is one of the regions into which Japanese NGOs entered first and play an active role so far. In this regionJapanese NGOs share a long-term stable partnership with Japanese government under a series of cooperation institutions and are strongly supported by the government from many aspects like financeintelligence and etc. The activities of Japanese NGOs in Southeast Asia not only make a difference in many aspects of Southeast Asian societybut also benefit Japanese diplomacy in this region to some degree. Thusthe case of Japan could also offer a reference for China’s NGO diplomacy.

Author: Bao Xiaqin, Professor of the International Studies, Research Fellow of the Collaborative Innovation Center of Territorial Sovereignty and Maritime Rights, Fudan University; Huang Bei, Postgraduate of School of International Studies and Public Affairs, Fudan University.

Official citation:Bao Xiaqin, Huang Bei, “The Roles of NGOs in Japan’s Diplomacy towards Southeast Asia and the Implications for China”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 149-164.

  

The Development of Indonesia’s Marine Economy and Its Implications for the Policy of China-Indonesia Cooperation on Marine Economy            

Wu Chongbo

Abstract:Indonesia is rich in marine resources. In recent yearsthe Indonesian government has formulated a new strategy for maritime development and adopted a series of measures to develop the marine economyso as to build itself into a maritime power. HoweverIndonesia is still confronted with many challenges in its efforts to develop marine economy and transform itself into a maritime power. ThereforeChina and Indonesia may be able to deepen their cooperation on marine economy through collaborations focused on offshore oil and gas drillingmarine fisheriesshipbuildingoffshore maritime transportations, and related industries.

Author: Wu Chongbo, Professor of the School for Southeast Asian Studies, Xiamen University.

Official citation:Wu Chongbo, “The Development of Indonesia’s Marine Economy and Its Implications for the Policy of China-Indonesia Cooperation on Marine Economy”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 165-180.

  

ASEAN Economic Community and Its FDI Dimension            

Li Wannan

Abstract:One of the ultimate objectives of ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) is to create a “single market and production base” and a “highly competitive economic region fully integrated in the global economy”. Besides trade liberalization and facilitationthe FDI inflows largely become an important indicator to determine the success or failure of ASEAN’s integration efforts. This study attempts to track ASEAN Economic Community’s progress and the trends of FDI inflows. And then it takes an effort to evaluate and judge whether or not AEC already met its goal as competitive production base. Finallyit points out the possible obstacles in the establishment of AEC.

Author: Li Wannan, Associate Professor of School of International Studies & Academy of Overseas Chinese Studies, Jinan University.

Official citation:Li Wannan, “ASEAN Economic Community and Its FDI Dimension”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 181-201.

  

Lancang-Mekong Cooperation: New Cooperate, New Community, New Challenge

Patcharinruja Juntaronanont and Piti Srisangnam

Abstract:In 2014China supported Thailand’s proposal to initiate a new cooperation framework for Lancang-Mekong Sub-regional countries. The first leaders’ meeting was held in SanyaChinain March 2016. The Lancang-Mekong cooperation LMCincludes China and five Southeast Asian countries located in the “Main Land ASEAN”namelyThailandCambodiaLao PDRMyanmar and Vietnam. This article explores the reasons that may explain China’s strong incentives to support this framework. From Thailand’s perspectivethe LMC is currently facing new challenges and opportunities in several fieldssuch as sustainable development and particularlymanagement of border-crossing rivers and related natural resources. In order to make this cooperation developed into an effective frameworkthere is a necessity that every country should participate into this cooperationand particularlyshould “build a trust among themselves”.

Author: Patcharinruja Juntaronanont Ph.DInstructor at Department of Social DevelopmentNational Institute of Development Administration NIDA),Thailand.Piti Srisangnam Assistant Professor of the Faculty of Economic and Academic Affairs Director of the ASEAN Studies Center at Chulalongkorn UniversityThailand.

Official citation:Patcharinruja Juntaronanont and Piti Srisangnam, “Lancang-Mekong Cooperation: New Cooperate, New Community, New Challenge”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 202-212.

  

The Background and Nature of the Philippines-Initiated Arbitration Case on South China Sea Issues: From the Perspective of the Game between China, Japan, and U.S. for Maritime Power                                          

Gao Lan

Abstract:The game between ChinaJapanand U.S. on the issues related to the disputes of South China Sea is actually a game of power politics beyond the frameworks of lawwhich is built on the defects of the current United Nation Convention of the Law of the Sea (UNCLS) and intensified during the process of South China Sea arbitration case initiated by the Philippines. More specificallythe United States took military deterrenceJapan adopted international intervention strategywhile China gave considerations to both international law and international cooperation simultaneously and also made diplomatic negotiations a priority. The fundamental divergence between the strategies adopted by these three countries is largely shaped by the different perceptions of these three countries on the UNCLSthe changes of the maritime order in the Asia-Pacificand the maritime game between traditional maritime powers such as the U.S. and Japan and the newly-emerging maritime power such as China.

Author: Gao Lan, Professor of Japan Studies Center, Fudan University.

Official citation:Gao Lan, “The Background and Nature of the Philippines-Initiated Arbitration Case on South China Sea Issues: From the Perspective of the Game between China, Japan, and U.S. for Maritime Power”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 215-234.

  

The Clues of Events and the Characteristics of the South China Sea Issues: From the Perspective of International Media in 2015                      

Ju Hailong

Abstract:In 2015the international media pushed hot debates and discussions on the issues of South China Sea continuouslywith a focus on two major clues of developments of situationsnamelyChina’s activities of land-filling on the islands of the South China Sea and the arbitration case initiated by the Philippines on South China Sea disputes. These two clues ignited a number of hot spots in news and pressforming a structure of “double-clue with multiple hot spots”. On the one handthis structure was fit for the law of continuous effective time of those hot spots in the international mediaand indicated the major forms and characteristics of the international communication of the South China sea issues. On the other handit maintained a high level of attentions towards these issues and created a strong momentum to propel further deepened discussions and debates on the issues related to maritime interests and South China Sea disputes. This momentum is influenced by the U.S. strategy of re-pivot to Asia that attempts to counter and suppress China’s geopolitical capacity in this regionand shaped by the U.S. efforts to destabilize China’s relations with its neighboring countries through the so-called “smart power”. Furthermoreit is also intensified by the U.S. advocacy of its so-called “principles of international law”which aims at a consolidation of its leadership in the international order of the Asia-Pacific and a deliberate framing that portraits China as an antagonist to the order defined by the international law. Undoubtedlythe South China Sea issues will continue to be hot spots in 2016 and related media hypes will keep focused on several core issues. This continued heat and the trend of fixing the core issues may provide opportunities for us to launch an all-directional media campaign of counter-offensive through proper methods.

Author: Ju Hailong, Professor and Deputy Dean of the School of International Studies and the Institute for Overseas Chinese Studies, Jinan University.

Official citation:Ju Hailong, “The Clues of Events and the Characteristics of the South China Sea Issues: From the Perspective of International Media in 2015”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2016, pp. 235-253.

  

  

Link to the Chinese version: http://www.iis.fudan.edu.cn/73/93/c11003a160659/page.htm