Journal of China's Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2 (2017)
  发布时间: 2019-09-30   访问次数: 88

Center for China’s Relations with Neighboring Countries of Fudan University (CCRNC-Fudan), ed., Journal of China’s Neighboring DiplomacyVol. 3, Issue 2, 2017.

Publisher: Social Sciences Academic Press (China)

Published in September 2019.

ISBN: 978-7-5201-4708-8



The Title Page of Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017


The Copyright Page of Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017

Contents

Preface                                               

Shi Yuanhua/1

Comprehensive Studies on China’s Neighboring Diplomacy

Ideas on China’s Diplomacy with Neighboring Countries: Real Conditions and Practical Strategy                                 

Zhou Fangyin/9

China’s Neighboring Diplomacy Strategy Guided by the Ideas of “Mutual Connectivity”                                        

 Zhao Minghao/21

The Ideas on China’s Neighboring Diplomacy during Hu Jintao’s Time

Zhong Feiteng/37

Analysis on Five Years’ Neighboring Diplomacy

Five Years’ Practice of Protecting Maritime Interests in the Seas of China’s Neighboring Areas: Practical Innovations and Experiences       

 Zhao Qinghai/57

Retrospect and Prospect on China’s Water Diplomacy since the 18th National Congress of Chinese Communist Party

                     Xiao Yang/70

The China-India Relations since the 18th National Congress of Chinese Communist Party: Development and Challenges                      

  Lin Minwang/92

The Belt and Road Initiative” Research

The Belt and Road Initiative” and the Problem of World Order

Su Jingxiang/107

The Origin, Characteristics, and Realistic Value of the Ancient Northeast Asian Silk Road 

                                                   Xu Bo/124

Early-Time Maritime Silk Road and the Confluence of Chinese and Indian Cultures on the Indochina Peninsula    

                          Gu Xiaosong/140

Studies on China’s Neighboring Areas

The Northeast Asian Economic Corridor’s Promotion on China’s “the Belt and Road Initiative” Construction 

                            Tu Bo, Zhang Yuan/157

Fishery Cooperation in the South China Sea Area and Its Influence on China’s Neighboring Diplomacy 

                    Ren Yuanzhe, Zhang Hang/168

The Rise of China and Its Influence on the Chinese Communities in Southeast Asia: A Case Study in Indonesia 

                          Hoon Chang Yau/183

Domestic Conditions of China’s Neighboring Countries

President Duterte’s Agenda for His Diplomacy towards China and the Future of ASEAN                                      

Henelito A. Sevilla/203

Hot Spots in Neighboring Areas

Power Politics” and China-U.S. Relations: A Case Study on the Korean Nuclear Issue                                               

Fang Xiuyu/223

Chinese and Foreign Perceptions on the Legal Connotations of the “U-shape” Borderline and Several Thoughts on China’s Effort to Protect Its Interests in the South China Sea                                           

Zhao Weihua/237

Reviews on Symposiums

A Review on the Symposium of “China’s New Concepts and New Thoughts of Neighboring Diplomacy since the 18th National Congress of Chinese Communist Party”                                                 

 Xu Zhe/257

A Review on the Symposium of “The Transforming Relations between China and ASEAN: Conflict Resolution and Win-win Cooperation”    

Chen Miaoling/267

A Review on the Symposium of “The Belt and Road, Neighboring Diplomacy, and Regional Cooperation in Northeastern Asia”        

 Qin Sheng/277

Appendix

Introduction on the Collaborative Innovation Center for Territorial Sovereignty and Maritime Rights (CICTSMR) /289

Introduction on Center for China’s Relations with Neighboring Countries (CCRNC-FUDAN) /291

Notice Inviting Contributions to the Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy /293


Ideas on China’s Diplomacy with Neighboring Countries: Real Conditions and Practical Strategy                     

Zhou Fangyin

Abstract: Since 2013Chinese government has proposed a series of important ideas on China's diplomacy with its neighboring countrieswhich contains outstanding significance and may offer long term guidance to China's neighboring diplomacy. In order to achieve certain effectsdifferent ideas in this field have different time spans and raise different requests towards real conditions. As a matter of factthe promotion of these ideas is also a process of competition between different ideas. Viewed from an objective perspectivethe international environment seems to be disadvantageous to China's effort to promote its new ideas on neighboring diplomacy. Thereforeit is necessary for Chinese policymakers to get adapted to the changing realitytake an effort to harness current momentum and convert it into favorable trendso as to build a micro-environment that may be beneficial to the development of those new ideas. Particularlycrisis management and control should be strengthened for the purpose of avoiding the scenario in which China's regional cooperation with its neighboring countries is largely dominated by their contradictions in security. At the same timethose new ideas themselves should be further optimized and adjusted so as to get them adapted to the reality.

Author:Zhou FangyinProfessor and Director of Center for Studies of Neighboring Strategies at the Guangdong Institute for International StrategiesExecutive Editor-in-Chief of Strategic Policymaking Studies.

Official citation: Zhou Fangyin, “Ideas on China’s Diplomacy with Neighboring Countries: Real Conditions and Practical Strategy”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 9-20.


China’s Neighboring Diplomacy Strategy Guided by the Ideas of “Mutual Connectivity”                                         

Zhao Minghao

Abstract: “Mutual connectivity” is one of the core ideas for people to understand the present reforms and future trends of China's neighboring diplomacy. In pace with the proceeding of the “Belt and Road” constructionChina has strengthened its mutual connectivity with its neighboring countries in the fields of hardwaresoftwareand humanity exchanges. Building mutual connectivity has become a major means and path for China to construct its diplomatic network and substantialize its idea of “a community of common destiny”. In briefthe concept of “mutual connectivity” is not only a policy objectivebut also a new world viewa new strategic mentalityand a new paradigm for international relations. Thereforeit is necessary to take further reflections on how to elaborate and construct the “mutual connectivity theory”. In this waythe theoretical innovation on China's neighboring diplomacy can be enriched.

Author:Zhao MinghaoPh.D.of LawSenior Research Fellow of the Center for Contemporary World Studies at the Foreign Liaison Department of the Central Committee of Chinese Communist PartyGuest Researcher of the Collaborative Innovation Center for South China Sea Issues.

Official citation: Zhao Minghao, “China’s Neighboring Diplomacy Strategy Guided by the Ideas of ‘Mutual Connectivity’”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 21-36.


The Ideas on China’s Neighboring Diplomacy during Hu Jintao’s Time

Zhong Feiteng

Abstract: During Hu Jintao's timeimportant progress was made in China's neighboring diplomacywhich enjoyed a degree of continuity. The guiding principle of “doing good to neighbors and regarding neighbors as partners” has been continuously practiced until present time. China is now attaching more importance to harmonious relations with neighboring countriesand the objectives of China's effort to build its relations with neighboring countries have become more and more specific and pragmatic. FurthermoreChina has been increasing its investmentintensifying its operationsand strengthening its capacity for building good relations with neighboring countriesso as to share its “development dividend” with the whole neighboring area. Based on a thorough reading and analysis over Hu Jintao's speeches on foreign policywhich have been collected and compiled in this paper concludes that Hu Jintao has made eight major contributions in the field of China's neighboring diplomacy. In Hu Jintao's timeChina's relations with neighboring countries was deepened to an unprecedented degreeas neighboring countries' economic and trade dependency on China is larger than China's dependency on them. On the other handneighboring areas accounted for a less share in China's overall external trade during Hu's timeso China began to examine its neighboring areas from a broader pictureso as to upgrade theoretic innovations on its diplomacy. The series of ideas about neighboring diplomacy that were proposed during Hu's time have laid solid foundations for the creation and development of new ideasmentalitiesand strategies of China's neighboring diplomacy after the 18 national congress of Chinese Communist Party.

Author:Zhong FeitengPh.D.and S.J.D.Director of division of big power relations studies in the Institute for Asia-Pacific and Global Strategic StudiesChinese Academy of Social Sciences.

Official citation: Zhong Feiteng, “The Ideas on China’s Neighboring Diplomacy during Hu Jintao’s Time”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 37-53.


Five Years’ Practice of Protecting Maritime Interests in the Seas of China’s Neighboring Areas: Practical Innovations and Experiences        

Zhao Qinghai

Abstract: The unwavering attitude to protect China's national maritime interests is perhaps the most outstanding symbol of China's neighboring diplomacy in the timewhich has been taking more and more initiatives. Since the 18 national congress of Chinese Communist Partya maritime strategy for strengthening China's national capacity has been proposed and adding new connotations into its activities of protecting maritime interests. At the same timethe new ideas of big power diplomacy with Chinese characteristics also emergedraising higher standards for China's maritime activities of protecting national interests. Under the guidance of these new ideas and perceptionsChinese government has been continuously strengthening its executive and legislative actions to protect national maritime interestsnormalizing its presence in the disputed territorial watersand competing for an initiative through its self-organized prospecting and development. On the other handit has been promoting facility constructions on rocks and reefs in the South China Seataking an active lead in the forming of standards and rules for maritime activitiesand adopting measures to handle confrontations and disputes cautiously in the field of international litigation and media. It has also managed to deal with the relations between interests-protection and stability-preservation. The successful implementation of the measures for protecting maritime interests results from an effect jointly created by the upgrading of China's overall national capacitythe close combination of top-level design and bottom-line mentalitythe construction of interests-protection mechanism and systemand the proper use of various strategies and policies. A summary on these experiences will highlight the future measures that China may take to protect its maritime interests.

Author:Zhao QinghaiResearcher and Director of the Center for Maritime Security and Cooperation at the China Institutes of International Studies CIIS.

Official citation: Zhao Qinghai, “Five Years’ Practice of Protecting Maritime Interests in the Seas of China’s Neighboring Areas: Practical Innovations and Experiences”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 57-69.


Retrospect and Prospect on China’s Water Diplomacy since the 18th National Congress of Chinese Communist Party                        

Xiao Yang

Abstract: Since the 18th national congress of Chinese Communist Partythe central committee of Chinese Communist Party led by XI Jinping has proposed a series of new ideasnew mentalitiesand new initiatives for promoting China's neighboring diplomacy. The strategic position of neighboring diplomacy has been apparently upgraded within China's overall diplomatic arrangement. As the cross-border water resource becomes an increasingly acute and serious issue,“water diplomacy” becomes a new form of diplomacywhose unique position and strategic significance attract more and more attentions. As part of neighboring diplomacywater diplomacy offers an effective path for China to resolve its disputes with neighboring countries on cross-border water resource issues. Furthermoreit is also a cooperative platform for China to develop good-neighbor relations with its surrounding countries. In recent yearsguided by the important idea of constructing a new type of international relations with a focus on cooperative win-win patternChina has been exploring new practices of water diplomacy towards neighboring countries and has already made outstanding achievements. In this sensea meticulous review and summarization of the new measures and new problems of China's water diplomacy in its neighboring areas is of great significance and may help to enrichdevelop and guide the theories and practices of China's neighboring diplomacy in this new era.

Author:Xiao YangPh.D.Candidate of International Law MajorWuhan UniversityResearch Fellow of the Collaborative Innovation Center for Territorial Sovereignty and Maritime RightsCICTSMR.

Official citation: Xiao Yang, “Retrospect and Prospect on China’s Water Diplomacy since the 18th National Congress of Chinese Communist Party”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 70-91.


The China-India Relations since the 18th National Congress of Chinese Communist Party: Development and Challenges                        

Lin Minwang

Abstract: Since the 18 national congress of Chinese Communist PartyChina has been implementing a more active diplomacy towards India. In 2013Chinese premier LI Keqiang chose India as the destination of his first foreign visit. Soon after Indian premier Modi took into office in May 2014Chinese supreme leader XI Jinping also visited India and established good working relations with Modi. Howeverthe China-India bilateral relations gradually got into a slump because of a series of structural factors of existing hostilitysuch as borderline confrontationsdivergent perceptions on the “One Belt One Road” Initiativeand some third-party factors. This trend of slump developed into the Donglong confrontation and conflict in 2017which was widely reported and exposed by the media. This paper aims at a systemic review and summarization on the changes and developments of China-India relations ever since China's 18 party congress in 2012.Based on this reviewthe author plans to reveal the inherent problems and challengesand discuss the prospect of this unique bilateral relations.

Author:Lin MinwangResearch Fellow of the Institute of International Studiesand Deputy Director of the Center for South Asian StudiesFudan University.

Official citation: Lin Minwang, “The China-India Relations since the 18th National Congress of Chinese Communist Party: Development and Challenges”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 92-103.


The Belt and Road Initiative” and the Problem of World Order

Su Jingxiang

Abstract: The inherent structure of the world order is incorporated and embodied the development process of human history and the overall change of the whole world. The first kind of world order in history is the compromises and confrontations between agricultural nations and nomadic peoples on the Euro-Asia Continent. Whereas the second kind of world order is the capitalism on the global scopewhich was once dominated by the western Europe. The core characteristic of the current world order is the desire of the United States to pursue world dominance by employing its unprecedented military advantages. It is important to find out whether or not “The Belt and Road Initiative” may be able to create plentiful material conditions for “new and higher productive relations” within the current world orderbecause this prospect determines whether or not this initiative may finally change the world order.

Author:Su JingxiangSenior Research Fellowthe China Institutes of International Studies CIIS.

Official citation: Su Jingxiang, “‘The Belt and Road Initiative’ and the Problem of World Order”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 107-123.


The Origin, Characteristics, and Realistic Value of the Ancient Northeast Asian Silk Road                                   

Xu Bo

Abstract: “The Belt and Road Initiative” employs the widely-accepted concept of ancient silk road to express its purpose of “bringing blessings to peoples of different countries of the world”.In this senseit is solidly supported by historical foundations. As part of the ancient land and maritime silk roadthe ancient Northeast Asian Silk Road was jointly opened and developed by various peoples living the Northeast Asian countriesso it contained a land-maritime dual nature. In the whole network of Eurasian silk roadsit enjoyed the longest historysustained real transports of silksand successfully integrated itself to early modern trade routes between the east and the west at the beginning of globalization age. Thereforeit has already become an important part of east-west transport routes in early modern time. In briefthe Northeast Asian region should be included into the areas covered by “the Belt and Road Initiative”. There are sufficient historical evidences that can support this claim.

Author:Xu BoSenior Editor and Former Editor-in-Chief of the magazine “The World Affairs”.

Official citation: Xu Bo, “The Origin, Characteristics, and Realistic Value of the Ancient Northeast Asian Silk Road”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 124-139.


Early-Time Maritime Silk Road and the Confluence of Chinese and Indian Cultures on the Indochina Peninsula                             

Gu Xiaosong

Abstract: The maritime silk road of ancient time is both a trade route on the sea that connected China and the West Asiaand a path for cultural exchanges. The Southeast Asia is a major area of cultural confluence. In the early timethe ships sailing along the maritime silk road were usually small and weak against stormy wavesso they had to sail beside coastlines and could not afford to navigate into the distant uncharted waters of vast oceans. In this waythe Indochina Peninsula gradually became an inevitable area of economic and cultural confluence between China and India. China's material culture was disseminated westward along the seaswhile India's culture was spread eastward along both land and sea routes. The exchanges and confluence of Chinese and Indian cultures not only promoted the social developments on the Indochina Peninsulabut also blended with each other. Particularlythe Cochin Area became a center for north-south exchanges of Buddhist cultures in ancient times. Viewed from a long-term historic perspectivethis confluence and mutual blending was a peaceful process without serious conflicts between civilizations.

Author:Gu XiaosongSenior Research Fellow of the Guangxi Academy of Social SciencesVice President of the Chinese Association of Southeast Asian Studiesand President of the Guangxi Association of Southeast Asian Studies.

Official citation: Gu Xiaosong, “Early-Time Maritime Silk Road and the Confluence of Chinese and Indian Cultures on the Indochina Peninsula”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 140-153.


The Northeast Asian Economic Corridor’s Promotion on China’s “the Belt and Road Initiative” Construction   

Tu Bo, Zhang Yuan

Abstract: Based on a thorough research of current literaturethis paper analyzes the forming and development of the “Northeast Asian Economic Corridor”describes the details of its contents and characteristicsand elaborates its promotion on China's “The Belt and Road Initiative”. The Northeast Asian Economic Corridor will assist the China-Mongolia-Russia economic corridor to take a strategic extension into the Korean Peninsula and contribute to the realization of the strategic design of “The Belt and Road Initiative” in the Northeast Asia region. It will work in coordination with China's domestic plan of rejuvenating Northeast China and expand the external trade of Northeast China. In this wayit will help to reinvigorate this old industrial area of China. Alsoit will help China to get involved in the peace and development process of the Korean Peninsula and bring long-term peace to this peninsula. Moreoverit will also break the U.S.-led strategic blockade circle in Northeast Asia towards China and extend China's strategic influence in this region.

Author:Tu BoPost-doctorate of International StudiesResearch Professorand Senior Research FellowEast Asia UniversitySouth Korea. Zhang YuanPost-doctorate of the Marxism Institute of the Dalian University of TechnologyAssociate Professor of the Marxism Institute of the Huaihai Institute of Technology.

Official citation: Tu Bo, Zhang Yuan, “The Northeast Asian Economic Corridor’s Promotion on China’s ‘the Belt and Road Initiative’ Construction”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 157-167.


Fishery Cooperation in the South China Sea Area and Its Influence on China’s Neighboring Diplomacy               

Ren Yuanzhe, Zhang Hang

Abstract: Fishery cooperation is an important part of maritime cooperation in the South China Sea. In recent yearsover-fishing and exacerbation of disputes on maritime legal enforcement in this region have become a serious threat to the rich fisher resources in the South China Sea region. Thereforea series of fishery cooperation mechanisms have been established in this region. In additionChina has been operating a multiple of bilateral and multilateral fishery cooperation schemes with relevant countries in this region. In pace with the change of regional order in the South China Sea areafishery has become an important issue that is employed by some countries to check and counterbalance China. There appear some hostile views towards Chinasuch as “the threat of Chinese fishermen” and “the responsibility of fisher”. At present the issue of fishery has become a touchstone to test China's relations with its neighboring countries and fishery cooperation has become one of the major paths to realize the idea of a community of common destiny in China's neighboring areas. Thereforesome work is needed to be done on the perceptional transformationpractical innovationand institutional constructionso as to achieve peace and stability in the South China Sea area through fisher cooperation.

Author:Ren YuanzheS.J.D.Associate Professor of Department of Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs Managementthe China Foreign Affairs UniversitySenior Research Fellow of the Collaborative Innovation Center for Territorial Sovereignty and Maritime Rights. Zhang Hangpostgraduate of 2015 classDepartment of Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs Managementthe China Foreign Affairs University.

Official citation: Ren Yuanzhe, Zhang Hang, “Fishery Cooperation in the South China Sea Area and Its Influence on China’s Neighboring Diplomacy”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 168-182.


The Rise of China and Its Influence on the Chinese Communities in Southeast Asia: A Case Study in Indonesia  

 Hoon Chang Yau

Abstract: The ethnic Chinese living in the Southeast Asia are leading private sectors in most member states of ASEAN. They are both investors that are important to Chinaand middlemen of many relevant trading activities. Due to China's continuous rise and the emerging of “One Belt One Road” initiativethe influence of Chinese communities in this region may be increased by a large marginand the relations between these communities and China will become even closer. This paper takes a case study on the ethnic Chinese living in Indonesiaand explores the dynamic relations between China and Chinese communities in Southeast Asia. Firstthis paper discusses the historical traces and diversity of these communities. Secondit takes a discussion on the discriminative policy of coercive assimilationwhich was enforced by former Indonesian leader Suhartowith a description on how this policy eliminated the cultural identification of ethnic Chinese. Finallythis paper takes an evaluation of the cultural politics of contemporary ethnic Chinese in Indonesiaand assess China's influence on the identify recognitions of them since the rise of China.

Author:Hoon Chang YauDirector of Center for Advanced StudiesAssociate Professor of Anthropology of the Institute of Asian StudiesUniversity of Brunei Darussalam.

Official citation: Hoon Chang Yau, “The Rise of China and Its Influence on the Chinese Communities in Southeast Asia: A Case Study in Indonesia”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 183-199.


President Duterte’s Agenda for His Diplomacy towards China and the Future of ASEAN                                      

Henelito A. Sevilla

Abstract: Since his inaugurationPresident Duterte has brought outstanding changes to the foreign policy of Philippines. Particularlythere have emerged major changes on Philippines' relations with its traditional allies such as U.S. and with big countries such as China and Russia. These changes are both shaped by the personal style of leadership of Duterte himselfand closely interrelated to the domestic environment of Philippines. The domestic environment influences Duterte's perceptions and interest-related judgmentsbut at the same timeit limits Duterte's policy options. This paper takes an effort to understand the subtle changes of the China-Philippines relations in the past year since Duterte's inauguration. As a matter of factthe China-Philippines is not the kind of strange relations described by the media in the westbut a kind of familiar relations in which both countries share many similaritiesso they can deepen their common interests. In additionthis paper also takes an analysis over the respective domestic problems of these two countriesand observes the possible influence that Duterte's foreign policy declaration will pose on ASEAN's political and economic trends.

Author:Henelito A.SevillaPh.D.Associate Professor of Center for Asian StudiesUniversity of the PhilippinesDiliman.

Official citation: Henelito A.Sevilla, “President Duterte’s Agenda for His Diplomacy towards China and the Future of ASEAN”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 203-220.


Power Politics” and China-U.S. Relations: A Case Study on the Korean Nuclear Issue                                         

 Fang Xiuyu

Abstract: China has developed a path of socialist development with Chinese characteristics and transformed its diplomacy for several times in the past several decades. The normalization of the China-U.S. relations in 1970s was one of the several major transformations of China's diplomacy with great historical significance. In pace with the rise of Chinathere are more and more convergences in the interests of China and U.S.and bilateral cooperation has been continuously deepened. Howeverthe factors of contradictions and divergences also become increasingly outstanding. Thereforehow to reduce the frictions between China and U.S. has become an important issue in the minds of policymakers of both countries. Historical experiences reveal that an intensification of big power cooperation will not only benefit the long-term stability between big powersbut also strengthen the security and stability in regions and the whole world. Due to its geopolitical peculiaritythe Korean Peninsula is inevitably influenced by big power relationsparticularly the China-U.S.relations. On the other handwhether or not China and U.S. can handle the current tensions on the Korean Peninsulais a delicate issue that will pose an effect on the China-U.S. relations.

Author:Fang XiuyuPh.D. of Political ScienceProfessor and Ph.D. Tutor of the Institute of International StudiesFudan University.

Official citation: Fang Xiuyu, “‘Power Politics’ and China-U.S. Relations: A Case Study on the Korean Nuclear Issue”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 223-236.


Chinese and Foreign Perceptions on the Legal Connotations of the “U-shape” Borderline and Several Thoughts on China’s Effort to Protect Its Interests in the South China Sea                                           

Zhao Weihua

Abstract: The legal position of “the intermittent line of South China Sea” maritime border line and territorial waters within this line has become the focus of the territorial disputes in the South China Sea. Currentlythis issue is not only hotly debated by various Chinese and foreign parties for the legal connotations of this linebut also attracting a diversity of opinions and viewpoints within China. On the other handChinese authority has never formally explained or elaborated the legal connotations of “the intermittent line of South China Sea” border linewhich puts China into a very disadvantageous position in the international public opinions. Actually great changes have taken place in the situations around the South China Sea ever since the outcome of the South China Sea arbitrary case was declared. ParticularlyChina's strategy of keeping obscurity on the legal connotations of “the intermittent line of South China Sea” border line is confronted with some challenges. Under such circumstancesone of the crucial missions of China's strategy in handling its neighboring diplomacy is to work out practicable plans to handle the situational change ahead of the momentum of general trend and figure out long term strategy to keep the stability of South China Sea and protect national sovereignty and maritime interests.

Author:Zhao WeihuaAssociate Professor of the Guangdong University of Foreign Studiesand Senior Research Fellow of the Guangdong Institute for International Strategies.

Official citation:Zhao Weihua, “Chinese and Foreign Perceptions on the Legal Connotations of the ‘U-shape’ Borderline and Several Thoughts on China’s Effort to Protect Its Interests in the South China Sea”, Journal of China’s Neighboring Diplomacy, Vol. 3, Issue 2, 2017, pp. 237-254.


Link to the Chinese version: http://www.iis.fudan.edu.cn/_s150/9b/cb/c11003a236491/page.psp